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The Adventures of FastMikie
in search of Truth and Beauty in the art of pocket billiards.




Tuesday, June 02, 2009

I like playing with my old balls

A couple of posts back I mentioned getting a new set of Aramith TV Pro Cup balls.  Right after that post, Dan W. showed up to play some straight pool, and of course I wanted to try out the new set of balls.  But that wasn't working out very well because I was missing almost everything; couldn't run more than 5 balls, and even that was a struggle!  What's up with that?  

To make matters worse, Dan was reiterating the many reasons why the Aramith balls are horrible, why they have killed the finesse game, why old-school pros hate these balls, etc.

So, after about an hour of agony, Dan hit the loo, and I switched back to my Centennial set, including the Brunswick Centennial blue circle cue ball.  What a huge difference!  My first turn at the table I ran 19, and it felt so good.  It seemed that the cue ball was really trying to do what I had in mind, whereas the Aramith "measle" ball seemed to do whatever the heck it wanted.  Not a good feature for a cue ball.

Dan says it's in the finish they use, probably for the purpose of keeping it cleaner longer, but whatever it is, it causes inconsistent results.  I'm thinking that maybe the threshold for control is precipitous in the Aramith ball, but scalar on the Centennial, if you catch my drift.

The upshot of the evening is that Dan totally whupped me like a red-headed stepchild, which he always does.  But that is expected, he plays at a higher level than I do, so I get to watch (and learn, hopefully).   

Anyone want to buy a brand new set of Aramith TV Pro-Cup balls, only used for a few racks?


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In other news,  Dan S.  (not related to Dan W.) stopped by unexpectedly to hit a few.  We played some 9-ball, a short race to 5, which I won at hill-hill.  

And in other-other news, I found myself at the Hungry Stick in San Diego and got into an impromptu competition with David C. as my first draw.  I got lucky and won the super-short, anyone-can-win race to 3 in 9-ball (my least favorite game) 3-0, then got bounced out in the next two draws. 

Anyone want to play some straight pool?  Please?

4 Comments:

Blogger Robert Johnson said...

You probably know, new (clean) behave differently from used (dirty) balls. With the newer balls you do not want to over-cut to allow for contact throw. Also, if you have a habit of using side English you may notice a difference in squirt or curve, even with a Predator shaft. I have trouble adapting also between new and old balls.

Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:03:00 PM  
Blogger J E F R E N said...

yeah... the newer polished balls will definitely act different.. the new balls will throw more and get more spin (possibly b/c it is more smooth) than the older balls..

the weight difference should not have that much effect..if you break the new balls in, u should see result more to your liking.

Wednesday, June 03, 2009 12:10:00 PM  
Blogger J E F R E N said...

the difference is weight is a little surprising perhaps u got a bad batch of balls?

i heard the professional-grade Centennial balls are more consistent but that is surprising b/c centenial and aramith is the same company.

also see...
http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/billiards.htm#balls

Wednesday, June 03, 2009 12:13:00 PM  
Blogger Robert Johnson said...

Jefren, I think the reason Wayne (at link you posted) saw more throw and spin with his new Heritage balls is because his old balls were worse quality. The Heritage balls might be more resilient and springy, compared to poor quality balls, allowing for contact throw. Usually new, polished balls have less grip than dirty balls (of the same quality), so ordinarily there would be less throw and spin.

It was nice reading about his small 3 ball in his Centennial set, and the calculations of size and weight affecting ball roll.

Wednesday, June 03, 2009 12:29:00 PM  

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